The Plasmatic Writer

The Official Page of Justin Bienvenue

Author . Poet . Horror Writer . Authorpreneur 

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The Horror's of Reconstruction

Posted on March 19, 2018 at 5:55 PM Comments comments (0)

The Reconstruction Era, it was a time period between 1863(or 1865 which ever you prefer) to 1877 in which the United States attempted to recover following several issues including the Civil War, slavery and the transition of states back into the union. While the era had it’s benefits and good days, the era was mostly hard on mostly everyone and left it’s mark as a hard way for people and communities to recover. Whether it was slavery, recovering from the Civil War or a transition from a south state back into the union the progress was the same for all, difficult. I could write a small book on this because of the amount of information on it but instead I am putting my focus on reconstruction in connection with the Civil War and western states and how it effected them. I also want to focus on the down side to reconstruction because it was certainly not a walk in the park or breath of fresh air, it was a time where the society that once destroyed themselves only years before had to come together to rebuild. One question haunts me however, has President Abraham Lincoln not been assassinated would reconstruction have been different? Easier? A smoother transition for the entire united states?


The Civil War, it’s one of the most fascinating yet most ridiculous wars we’ve ever seen. Fascinating in the sense of now as you look back at it as nostalgia and rustic feeling but ridiculous in the sense that it was a war that we fought...against ourselves. The aftermath of the war was just as hard on people as the war itself. People had to reclaim land, property, but most of all they had to clean up and rebuild their towns which turned into utter decay and wastelands of rubble. For some it took a mere few months, for others they simply moved on somewhere else and for most it took years to not only reclaim but to replace what they once had. You can add all the treaties, policies and acts that you want that factor in but in reality what is a piece of paper to something that needed to be physically done, fixed and rebuilt? The years after the Civil War were just a cruel to people who battled in it. It’s hard to imagine what was worse, a soldier who survived and went through reconstruction or a person who didn’t who lost someone and had to carry on through an era to which they never wanted to go back into. The Civil War left imprints and foreshadowed the U.S to a massive cleanup that no one could have seen coming despite a horrendous war.

 

The violence didn’t end when the war did. Let that sink in. When some men returned from the war they just weren’t the same men they were before they left. Some could get over what they felt was right but none could recover from what they saw or felt. One reason violence still reigned supreme was because there was still tension between the North and South states. Many southerners would kill after the war because they still believed in the confederacy and northerners would kill simply out of spite, hatred or because it’s all they knew. It was called reconstruction but tell that to the countless lives lost well after the war ended.


To them it was resuming and continuation of something that was just pointless to begin with. Small towns were sometimes swallowed whole with three reasons to their downfalls, wreckage, politics and other people coming in to destroy what little remained. One book that does a great job of portraying people against one another during reconstruction is Skin Medicine by Tim Curran, a horror western. The main character Tyler Cabe who fought comes into a town where the Sheriff is someone who punished him during the war. The point is that thr Wild West and reconstruction go hand in hand and they have violence to that for that.


The Civil War era, The Wild West and Reconstruction era were a deadly time in our history which as we look back we ask, why did some of it if not all of it need to happen? All accounted for bloodshed, death and destruction that never needed to happen. Perhaps the only benefit is the shape and direction our country took after the war and the era. The horrors of reconstruction impacted so many people, rich and poor, well known or not well known, it just didn’t matter. If you were anybody you accounted for everybody and the effects were felt by all those who involved or were bystanders to the destruction. Was reconstruction supposed to be an easy clean up? A simple era? A time where we could simply move on and forget the war ever happened and live happily ever after? Not in the slightest. The error with man is that it is in our nature to destroy ourselves even if it means actually fighting our own people in our own country in our own backyards because in the end, we will move on slowly and we learn. We learn from our errors and our ways...

The Top Ten Best Poets

Posted on March 12, 2018 at 5:45 PM Comments comments (0)

Who is the best poet of all time? Well the answer may differ depending on who you ask. There have been so many tremendous poets in history and the best thing of all is that they are still being talked about and read today. While many people have their own opinion on who the best poet is I have devised my own list. Here are my top ten best poets.

 

10. Ralph Waldo Emerson

Known for transcendentalism and his poem “Nature” which is an absolute work of pure beauty, Emerson’s soft spoken yet crisp original words place him at the top of the list.


9. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Aside from being that poet dude with the big beard, Longfellow is also known for his poem, Paul Revere’s ride, The Song of Hiawatha and the first American to translate Dante’s Divine Comedy.

 

8. Lord Byron

Byron is one of those people who you’ve probably heard of but have no idea of how talented he was. He was during the Romantic movement and wrote many love poems including “She Walks in Beauty”.


7. John Keats

Keats was also a writer during the Romantic Movement and worte many love ballads and poems. While he died at age 25 of illness his poetry would go onto to be well received and popular long after his death.

 

6. Langston Hughes

A personal favorite of mine, Hughes was one of the best poets of his generation. His sometimes hidden or straight forward way with words or his simple 6 line poems Hughes was a quite a remarkable man and poet.

 

5. Robert Frost

“The Road Not Taken” in my opinion is not only a great poem but a great metaphor and inspiration for life. Frost is one of the best rhyming poets and really told a story in his poems.

 

4. Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou was one of the best modern poets of her generation. She was real, raw and sometimes controversial with her poems but they told of her life and others and they made an impact.

 

3. Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson may be one of the most popular and well known poets but in real life and during her life she was depressed and a bit of a recluse spending months upon months in her room. It’s no wonder her words are so strong and still known today.

 

2. Edgar Allan Poe

I know what your thinking, how is Poe only number 2 on a list of poets that I made? Well to be honest I wasn’t going to include him because of his horror and story writing but I cannot deny that Poe was a heck of a poet. His stories he told in poetic form and his dark tales are still loved by many.

 

1. William Shakespeare

A bit surprised are you? Shakespeare wrote sonnets, ballads, lyrical poems but he has to be number one because he created his own words, his own language and his own structure in poetry. To not put him at one would be blasphemous. Shakespeare wrote love poems, told dramatic stories and could spin even the most simple thing into a thing of beauty.

Poetry: Simple to Create But Difficult to Sell

Posted on March 12, 2018 at 5:45 PM Comments comments (0)

Poetry, it’s sweet simplicity and originality is a writing form that people have been writing in for centuries. Poetry however is a genre that many either love or hate, some just love reading about the rhyme, the powerful words while others find it dreadful and just utterly boring. Back in the day poetry had a strong following and we still read or at least know of certain poems or quotes that have stood the test of time. Poetry today is not as popular, take it from someone who knows. As someone who writes poetry frequently and has 3 books of poems I can tell you that the market and need for poetry is certainly not in demand. Sure, like many things and genres poetry has a market it’s just not as mainstream as a poet would like which means poetry is hard to sell, perhaps a lot more hard to sell than I’m willing to admit. You work and you write but you find that at the end of the day that it’s far easier to write poetry than it is to sell it. Shakespeare, Poe, Emerson, Frost and Lord Byron may not have had to worry about selling their work but for a modern poet the times are tough and it’s not hard to see that poetry is hard to sell.


So why is poetry hard to sell aside from the main fact that it’s not as popular? Well there are a few reasons but let’s start with the second main one, other genres. With horror at an all time high, young adult romance trending and even erotica being written poetry seems to take a back seat or rides the caboose when it comes to being a popular bought genre. Science Fiction is a genre people have been reading a lot of as well. There’s just so many genres out there and so many new ones that in a world where people have short attention spans you’d think that’d enjoy something short and sweet but in reality that short attention span comes with wanting new things and many feel poetry has already been here or been here done that. Sure it can also be viewed as a you don’t know until you try but again as someone who writes poetry I can tell you right now I’d rather appeal to poetry lovers than try to convince someone to like it. Your books and your writing are not going to appeal to everyone and while you could try to convince someone every once in a while you should always appeal to your audience especially with poetry because it’s the only fan base you have.


Poetry has become more of something people do in their down time. They want to express themselves, they write a poem; it’s just something they do every once in a while but how many people today strive off making a career out of poetry? Yes, there’s poets out there I’m aware but my point is that you really have to be creative and really stand out from the crowd in order to sell it. One poet who has no trouble selling her poetry is Rupi Kaur. She’s an Indian poet who sells roughly around 300-500 copies a month. Her poetry looks to be more on the inspirational and current events side so it’s no wonder why her work resonates so well and grabs the attention of readers. So if a poet wants to know how to sell their poetry they should see what Rupi Kaur is doing and try it out and apply it to their marketing and see how they fair. A writer can try selling their poetry just like others do in selling their genres but they should also be ready for disappointment as some things just may not translate to poetry like they do for other genres. I will say this, while I am someone who has yet to find gold in selling my poetry I am continuing to look for poetry lovers, a poetry audience, that small niche group of people whom my work will appeal to. So keep looking and reach your audience by sticking to readers of poetry, perhaps maybe then poetry will pick up and sell.

Horror in the Real World

Posted on February 26, 2018 at 2:15 PM Comments comments (0)

Serial Killers are probably the most clear evidence of real horror. People without a conscience or shred of remorse or human decency. Yet while they are on the top of the real life horror pyramid who and what makes up the rest? Think about the question and I’m sure you can come up with a few ideas. Current events, whether your reading it right now there’s some known violence going on in the world, there will be further violence in the future and that will be the latest current event of real world horror because this world is one big world of horror. School shootings, stabbing of spouses, setting houses on fire, going on a killing spree, people overdosing on drugs; these are just of the few real world horrors we deal with every single day and the saddest part of all? We will likely continue to see them every single day because it’s just simply how the world works, for every peaceful and blessed thought a normal person has there is a raging psychopathic lunatic who just loves to watch the world burn along with the people in it.


Of course we want to live in a world where peace runs rampant and violence and horror don’t exist but that would seem too ideal, too unrealistic. Some of us are horror genre fans who love scary and gory movies, books and conventions. Why do we love these things? Because they are fictional and made for our entertainment and yet despite being exactly the same, the real world of horror is something that no person wants to experience, wants to feel or see and most importantly of all hates seeing because it isn’t the horror we want to be exposed to. Guns kill people, guns kill people with guns, people kill people; however you choose to see the glass here just remember that the end result will be the glass shattering. It’s all violent no matter how you look at it and it’s truly baffling how people can actually think that using a gun can make a difference. Guns are like drugs, they are a horror in our world and when given to the wrong people can cause utter chaos and even bring out the worst in sometimes the best of a person. Guns are vessels of horror, they do not make the world a better place no matter how many times you try to spin it.


However for every crime spree, every gun fired and every house set a blaze there is a person behind it. Some people are horrific, inexcusable excrements for human beings, psychopaths, not fit for this world or any known to exist but yet here they are in our world sharing space and air with us and why? Well that’s a question that if we knew maybe just maybe we could put a stop to it but again violence and horror in the real world is an inevitability. If not one thing then surely it’s something else. Can we treat each other better? Of course we can. Will it help? In a sense. Can it stop people from becoming a part of horror and violence? That remains to be seen. The horrors of the real world have become such an every day sight and yet despite this we still remain shocked when we hear something horrific happen. Why is this? Because we’d like to think that the world isn’t fifty percent made up of grizzly and traumatic events and psychos but your local channel news, twitter feed and current events remind you that horror is real, it’s all too real.


The scariest thing you’ll ever read isn’t a Stephen King book, the scariest thing you’ll ever see on television isn’t a John Carpenter movie, it’s what’s around you happening in the place you call home. The true horror is the horror that’s preceded by the word “real”. It’s horror we wish was directed, produced and considered as fiction but we cannot change the real horrors around us, at least not right away. Remember the kind of person you are, remember that what ever problems you may have and whatever troubles you may come across that you want to live life to the best of your ability because horrors happen every day and you truly never know when it may involve you.

Horror Poems by Non Horror Poets

Posted on February 26, 2018 at 2:00 PM Comments comments (0)

When we think horror poetry we think of Edgar Allan Poe and perhaps even his most infamous poem, The Raven. We think of all his other poetic horror verses and think no one else can eclipse this. However aside from Poe who else write horror poetry? Well aside from Poe and myself I cannot definitively think of someone else that comes to mind that could be considered a horror poet. Sure there’s A Season in Hell by Arthur Rimbaud but that he was a one hit wonder and never wrote again and I’m not even sure he meant to write it as a poem but merely expressed his adolescent frustrations in exaggerated form. Then of course there’s Dante’s Inferno but that’s more of a glorified story of myth.


So seeing as there isn’t any other true horror poets to name let’s go with the next best thing, poems of horror by other poets. Poets who write about life, nature, feelings you know the things you normally write a poem about? Well perhaps some of the poets who write these are your favorite and you didn’t even know they had a horror or dark poem. Here are some poems who have stepped into the dark side to write horror poetry.


The Dance of Death

by Charles Baudelaire


https://www.poetrysoup.com/famous/poem/the_dance_of_death_19570" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">https://www.poetrysoup.com/famous/poem/the_dance_of_death_19570


The poem is a gothic and macabre poem about a subtle take on death. Baudelarie was a French poet who wrote prose poetry and while he didn’t always write dark poetry he was a translator of Edgar Allan Poe works. This poem of his is one of his own original takes on horror poetry.



Haunted

by Siegfried Sassoon


https://www.poetrysoup.com/famous/poem/haunted_178" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">https://www.poetrysoup.com/famous/poem/haunted_178


The creepy and chilling poem that tells of a man being haunted and his paranoia gets the best of him. Sassoon was a former solider who wrote about the horrors of war. This poem is a different approach to the normal types of horror he writes.


Because I Could Not Stop For Death

by Emily Dickinson


http://www.thingsthatgoboo.com/scarypoems/dpstopfordeath.htm


A poem that while not exactly considered to be horror still talks about and mentions death in a more everyday type fashion. Emily Dickinson was known for her contemporary poetry and at times wrote depression poems of someone in isolation. This poem is one of a few where Dickinson talks about death.



Ghost House

by Robert Frost


http://www.thingsthatgoboo.com/scarypoems/dpghosthouse.htm


Ghost House is a somber and chilling tale of a house and it’s many dark sights. Robert Frost is known for many types of poems but horror poetry is not one of them. However, Frost totally pulls it off with this whimsical light horror poem.


Windigo

by Louis Erdrich


https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/43086/windigo" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/43086/windigo


A tale about the flesh eating Algonquin monster. Louis Erdrich needs only a few stanzas to get you so freaked out that you start asking yourself if Wendigos really exist. As someone who enjoys the myth of Wendigoes I found this poem to be a treat..no pun intended.


So as you can tell you don’t need to be a writer of the horror genre to write horror or scary poems. Some well known and not so known poets have written some absolute gems of poems that both scare, excite and reading get a reader to think. Poetry has no rules so if your not a writer of horror or heck even if your not a poet but have a horrific story to tell in poetic form then do what these poets did, take a page out of someone else’s book and get writing.

The Horror of Politics

Posted on February 26, 2018 at 1:10 PM Comments comments (0)

Politics, a topic that you either think you know, actually like and enjoy making an opinion about, or have no interest in whatsoever and couldn’t care less about. If your like me you fall under the third category but given our new president lots of people such as myself who have no business talking politics are talking about it and rightfully so. Now more than ever there is clear evidence that there’s horror in politics, let me rephrase that politics are horror. Now I could sit here and slam the president but that’s not the point of this article.


The point is to show that the overall basis of politics, their tactics and the whole running for office seats in itself has become downright horrific. Politics have always been like this, it doesn’t take a follower of it to see that but when you have two people running for president whose wild views and opinions are out there, it makes you wonder how it’s come to this and really makes you believe that horror is in full mainstream view and all over even in congress and press. Go down the line and you’ll see countless dirty politicians doing whatever they can to win a seat or become president but it just feels raises one of the biggest question of all...what is our country in for with Donald Trump as president?


While you think about that question let me ask you another, is a Trump as president just as scary as a horror villain killing people or a gross gory scene? Before you think they have nothing to do with each other just remember this...Trump is real which means that yes there is most definitely a connection here. I’m sure many would rather be in a world of horror slashers than have to listen to the ignorant rambling of an ignorant fool. What I’m really getting at though is the reality of horror. True and real horror exists and I’m not talking about ghosts and paranormal I’m talking about bad decision making along with economical and social decline that our country faces with Trump as president.


It’s real horror, it’s truly real horror there’s no other way for to put it. It’s like asking if you want Michael Myers or Jason Voorhees for president and yes you have to vote for one. Sure there’s the other parties but let’s say that would be the equivalent of voting for a lesser evil that we know nothing about and we actually put our faith in Myers or Voorhees because at least we have an idea of what they are whereas voting for the lesser evils is a greater risk because not much is known about them.


Lesser of the two evils? Whose Myers and Voorhees? It doesn’t really matter. They are mere examples of horror and if anything let it serve as a question of who would you choose between the two and Trump. I’m sure you get the idea. Bottom line, I think people would rather vote for one of the movie slashers than Trump. Sure this seems a bit ridiculous but do we really have to think about it? The man is just as scary as the two horror slashers and that’s downright frightening. Politics are evil, they bring out the worst in people and if you’re already deemed a bad person it just shows the world just how bad you truly are in the public eye.


To me there are not winners in politics or in the becoming the next president because so much slander and nonsense gets brought up that the you try to make yourself look good but you end up hurting people and causing turmoil in the process. People have become so eager to obtain seats of power that they forget what they are running for...the people. When one of the candidates is clearly not a people person and degrades others what does it really say? It shows that there is true evil in this world and that there is real horror and most of it happens in the misconstrued lines that we call politics.

Unknown Outlaws

Posted on February 19, 2018 at 5:25 PM Comments comments (0)

Jesse James, Billy the Kid, Doc Holliday, “Curly Bill” Brocius, Butch Cassidy and Henry Longabaugh aka The Sundance Kid. These were some of the most notorious and well known outlaws of the wild west but for every well known outlaw there is one of equal crimes but lesser known. The men listed above are known throughout history for their bad reputations, their countless run-ins with the law and their violent crimes. There is however other men and even women who had just as bad as reputations and committed just as unspeakable of crimes as their notorious counterparts. Below I will name several unknown outlaws that history hasn’t necessarily forgotten but doesn’t really polarize as much as the famous ones.


-Black Bart: Real name Charles Earl Boles, Black Part was an English outlaw who was one of the most notorious stage-coach robbers of his time, robbing stage coaches in Oregon and California in the 1870s and 1880's. He was considered a gentlemen because he would leave poems and messages behind after his crime, be polite to people while sticking them up and he would even decline money offered to him during robberies as he would state he only wanted the money of the Wells Fargo stage coaches he was robbing. He served eight years for his crimes and supposedly died in 1888. It is claimed Wells Fargo paid him off to keep him from robbing them but Wells Fargo denied any such claim.


-John King Fisher: While he was a lawman for a very short time, John King Fisher was an outlaw and one of the most violent. Fisher is known for wearing bright colors, uncommon for outlaws who mainly wore dark colors. He was known for his violent streak as he would kill members of his own gang, beat people down and even shoot and kill unarmed people. Fisher was gunned down in 1884 being shot thirteen times after getting into a dispute with a theater owner and known gunslinger.


-Elmer McCurdy: McCurdy was a bank and train robber but not a very good one. He used explosives which usually backfired on him as he never knew how much to use and usually had to flee escaping with no money. McCurdy was killed by police during a train robbery in 1911. McCurdy’s body was mummified and put on display in an Oklahoma funeral home and would become a popular attraction during carnivals and side shows. Coins would be places in his mouth as a gesture to see him. McCurdy’s body would be used for shows and as a prop for more than 60 years until a film crew for the show of “The Six Million Dollar Man” found it was a real body in 1976. He was finally buried in concrete in 1977 so no one would disturb his remains.


-Pearl Hart: After her abusive husband left her to fight in the war, Pearl Hart fell in with the wrong crowd. She and a man she met who was a gambler would go around robbing stage coaches. She was eventually caught but would charm her way out of prison. She would dress in men’s clothing and aside from stealing money would also steal firearms. She was in and out of prison for most her life. She supposedly settled down and opened a store under another name. She is said to have died in 1955 but as late as 1960.


-Belle Starr: Belle Starr aka The Bandit Queen was from a rich family and told to act like a proper girl however she wanted nothing to do with such a lifestyle. She got into a dispute with her family when she married fellow outlaw Jim Reed. She was also associated with the James-Younger gang. She was known for house and horse theft and caught where she spent time with her husband in and out of prison. She was ambushed and murdered in 1889 by an unknown assailant and to this day the case remains unsolved.


These are just a few of some of the most unknown and underrated outlaws of the wild west era. While they may not be as popular or have a catchy name, their crimes leave a mark today as a blemish in our countries history. Some tried to make an honest life for themselves either before or after becoming outlaws but it seems the life always finds them again and they are back to their crime killing ways until it caught up to them and was the reason they ended up dead. Here are a list of some more lesser known outlaws and some of the ones mentioned here.


https://list25.com/25-most-notorious-outlaws-of-the-wild-west/4/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">https://list25.com/25-most-notorious-outlaws-of-the-wild-west/4/


http://thechive.com/2015/08/20/15-of-the-most-infamous-and-deadly-gunslingers-in-history-15-photos/


https://owlcation.com/humanities/10-Notorious-Female-Outlaws-from-the-Wild-West" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">https://owlcation.com/humanities/10-Notorious-Female-Outlaws-from-the-Wild-West


From Booming to Ghost Town

Posted on February 19, 2018 at 3:45 PM Comments comments (0)

Ghost Towns, you know of them or even know of one, heck you may even live in one yourself but what exactly is a ghost town? Sure, it could be a town inhabited by ghosts but that’s not what I’m talking about here, although the tv show Ghost Wars does a good job of this. In this case a ghost town is a town, usually a small one that gets destroyed, taken over, or in most cases the people leave out of their own free will or they are driven out. But why? What could possibly make people simply live in a town one minute and be gone from it the next? Well there’s a lot of factors here but the biggest one is that sometimes abandonment is inevitable or even necessary in order to live, it’s seen as a ways to move on. In this article we will find out what makes a town go from booming to ghost town but more importantly why it happened so much during the Wild West Era, an era that was cruel, rugged and in many cases, lonely and drove so many people from their homes. So what makes a small western town go from booming to a desolate and forgotten place?


The Wild West was a time where people would gun you down simply for looking at them wrong. It was a time where people were dirty, reckless, ruthless and savage. Also during these times it was so easy to build a town from scratch. Watch any western tv show from the fifties and look at the buildings. Sure these are tv shows and props of buildings and what not but to be honest, it wasn’t much different during the real western era. Buildings were usually all constructed the same and took little to no time to put up. So why were they left abandoned sometimes? There’s a few factors.


-Outlaws/Crime: We all love a good western story but knowing that outlaws were real sometimes hits all too close to home. One reason a town became a ghost town was because crime was just not unavoidable. Outlaws would come in, stake their claim and simply wipeout or run out the townspeople including the sheriff. They would either kill everyone, use guerilla warfare and burn the place down or in the most common fashion, run everyone out and leave themselves, leaving only the buildings of what used to be a promising town.


-Change/Reconstruction: During this time it was always about location. Sometimes were you set up a town may not have been the safest or financially the best, so when it became time people would move out all together and build elsewhere or go on their own way. What did they leave behind? Probably nothing, maybe everything but one thing they just left without a second thought was the town, becoming a ghost town, a shell of it’s former glory and lively populous reputation.

https://www.pinterest.com/justinbienvenue/vintage-ghost-towns/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://https://www.pinterest.com/justinbienvenue/vintage-ghost-towns/


Booming during the wild west era was temporary. Many towns were like small businesses today, one day they could be on the top of their world but eventually time and bigger businesses will come along and just wipe them out of existence. What was once popular and the place to go or be will become sad memories and remnants of what used to be. Don’t let the wild west fool you though, ghost towns happened all over in many different eras not just the wild west to which they are mainly known; in fact some ghost towns are still popping up even today. Abandoned places are one of the most sad and yet most beautiful places you will ever come across as they have so much history left behind and if they could talk would tell you of many a tale. Ghost towns are just one of many abandoned places, they tell you of either a simpler time or a just as hard enough time if not even more hard time to live.


Ghost towns remind us that of the past but they also tell us that unless we want to end up just like them, we need to slowly adapt to our surroundings, to better ourselves, to make the most of our opportunities. A story called, The Ghost Town Gun Ghost by L. Ron Hubbard tells of a man who rides into a ghost town and finds another man. The man asks him where he can stay and if he can talk to the sheriff and finds that the man is the only one in town and serves all duties of the town. It’s an odd but fun story and the reason I bring it up is because it’s a great representation of not wanting to let go of the past. Even when only a ghost town surrounds you you try to make the most of it but in most cases people don’t stay they leave behind ghosts. So the next time you see an old western ghost town or perhaps your car breaks down in an old rundown town, take a look at it all and take it all in. Perhaps the history of the place will reveal itself to you, or you can create your own story of what it used to be like there.

Defining Horror Poetry

Posted on February 12, 2018 at 4:45 PM Comments comments (0)

You know what horror is and you know what poetry is but what is horror poetry? You may even be one of those people who says, “Horror Poetry, that’s a thing?” Yes, yes it is. So what is horror poetry? Well imagine your basics types of poetry; rhyme, ballad, sonnet, free verse, etc. Then imagine your feelings and emotions only you turn those into a more fictional aspect and bring the genre of horror into it. Finally, gather your thoughts, the stories, the feelings and everything dark that’s flowing through your head and create a dark poem and you have horror poetry. This is the best definition I can give you because If I had said it’s a poem with horror elements..well you’re not really told or sold on what it is. Horror poetry is just like any other type of poetry you’d write only your getting deeper, darker and adding fear and sadness into it, more than you would with raw emotional type of poetry. One could get making a drinking game and get drunk every time I mention him but Edgar Allan Poe was a writer of horror poetry and perhaps even the best and few to do it. The Raven, one of his classics, is one of the greatest horror poems ever written. Do people enjoy horror poetry? A lot more than you might think.


Horror poetry could also be considered a part of speculative poetry, which is poetry that focuses on fantasy, science fiction and mythological themes. Horror literature itself is immensely popular in today’s culture and while poetry isn’t as big as it once used to be, most true horror fans are aslo interested in horror poetry. In a lot of ways poetry in this sense is another and rather unique literary device to showcase horror. It’s a way to introduce horror to horror fans in a whole new setting and there’s nothing wrong with that in fact it could be considered better and a way to get people more accustomed to poetry.


The thing to know about horror poetry is like regular poetry it can be written in any way you wish and there are no rules. It could be a horror haiku, a horror ballad, an epic or even like The Raven or A Season in Hell, a long poem that tells a tale or expresses the horrifying frustrations of a young poet. Poetry is whatever you want it to be and this is how some horror writers who are also poets express themselves, by combining the two to create a piece of macabre written art to be read and enjoyed.


Horror poetry’s biggest weakness it also it’s biggest strength. It’s not widely written nor does it have a big audience(when defining it by itself and not considered as just horror). This is it’s weakness as not many people write it and not many follow it as readers however this is also a strength and it’s advantage because there’s not a big market, a writer can truly gain some solid readers and fans because it’s not really known. Horror poetry is a niche a writer and poet can truly make their own, they can be themselves and enjoy their horror at the same time, this is a clear case of having your cake and eating it too. Horror Poetry may not be Paranormal Romance, Young Adult or a boy wizard going through life entertaining tons of young readers but it doesn’t have to be and no one is asking it to be. Horror poetry is a way of expression, a way to tell a horrific story in a delicate style; it’s showing the twisted side of poetry and all the things that make it great.

The Difference Between Macabre & Gothic

Posted on February 12, 2018 at 3:55 PM Comments comments (0)

The Difference between Macabre & Gothic

Macabre and gothic, when it comes to the horror world these are two words you tend to see associated with the genre. Sometimes although not in most cases macabre and gothic could be considered one in the same or used during the same event to describe something, but what exactly are macabre and gothic and how much do they differ? It is important to see the two differences so that one can fully understand and appreciate them as tones and themes of the horror genre.

Macabre; adjective: disturbing and horrifying because of involvement with or depiction of death and injury. The adjective macabre is used to describe things that involve the horror of death or violence. ... This word first appeared in English in the context of the "Dance of Death," recounted in literature as the figure of Death leading people in a dance to the grave, and translated from the Old French Danse Macabre. As you can see macabre is used to describe a horrifying event or happening and it prominently is used to describe death. Macabre is in many ways a fancy word one can use instead or horror, death, morbid, etc. When we hear the word macabre we sometimes often associate it with the famous horror writer Edgar Allan Poe, who is a perfect example of a writer of macabre. Macabre is a brilliantly chilling word and such a big and meaningful word that in some ways it could be considered as a small sub-genre of horror, the very word it represents.

Gothic: adjective:

1.

relating to the Goths or their extinct East Germanic language, which provides the earliest manuscript evidence of any Germanic language (4th–6th centuries AD).

2.

of or in the style of architecture prevalent in western Europe in the 12th–16th centuries, characterized by pointed arches, rib vaults, and flying buttresses, together with large windows and elaborate tracery. Definition of Gothic Fiction. The term Gothic fiction refers to a style of writing that is characterized by elements of fear, horror, death, and gloom, as well as romantic elements, such as nature, individuality, and very high emotion. These emotions can include fear and suspense. Gothic is vastly more different then macabre considering that it is not always associated with the horror genre. As you read above gothic can be used to describe a style, a movement, a word, a group of people or even a feeling, so gothic in many ways is a lot more defined and represents may other things whereas macabre is only a sub part represented of horror. However, you will also see how gothic and macabre share a common trait, they are both associated with fear, horror, death and just an overall sense of dread. I consider gothic in terms of horror as the outlet and exterior of horror, used to lightly describe the dark feelings of dread, sadness and horror itself.

While clearly we can see the differences between the two what is it that makes them work well together and makes them at times seem like they mean the same thing? Well aside from the fact they both represent horror in their own unique ways, the feeling, the characterizations and the overall presence of both words can be felt at the same time or even different times both both mean the same thing; they are horror, they are death, they are feelings you simply don’t want to find yourself in or see. They are just two of many words associated with horror that give you fear that give you suspense, that make you want to turn away and yet want more all at the same time. Macabre and Gothic aren’t friends, they are relatives and they do whatever they can to help out their big relative, horror.

If Poe Lived in This Era

Posted on February 5, 2018 at 4:35 PM Comments comments (0)

Edgar Allan Poe, you’ve likely heard of him and whether you’re a fan of his work or not you cannot dent the impact he has left on the horror, short story and poetry culture. However not many people are aware that Poe was not all that popular in his day, in fact his writing was highly and publicly criticized and he was a bit of an outcast. He tried and tried day in and day out to get his works published and sometimes even that was not all that easy to do. Between trying to get published and getting the public to like his work Poe had quite the work to do after writing it. Many authors today complain about getting their work out and marketing but perhaps never truly know the struggle it was for Edgar Allan Poe. On top of all that, his life was also troubled and he was a heavy drinker which was partly the reason his works were so dark and disturbing. Poe was somewhat popular and had a following in his day but was more widely regarded as a success after his death and still today but to me it has raised a big question, what if Poe lived in this era? What if one of the greatest horror writers of all time lived during the time where the public still scrutinizes writers, social media exists helping criticism in volumes but horror is extremely popular?

First, let’s delve a little deeper into that last point. Poe would still be criticized but more likely for how he wrote not necessarily what he wrote. As I said, horror is very popular and he’d probably be as popular as Stephen King if not more popular. Poe would likely sell tons of books, would get tons of publishing deals and be a huge figure in today’s society. I mean just imagine Poe eating one of his haters alive on Facebook or Twitter by humiliating them by writing his comeback in an epic 240 character poem. Did Poe care what people thought of him and his work when he was alive? I’m sure he did but given how motivated he’d be today I’d like to think he’d care way less and let hi writing do the talking. If Poe were alive today horror poetry would be huge and we’d look to him even more for inspiration and help within the genre. Instead we try to eclipse him on Amazon on the top ten of poetry books feeling that if he were still alive and in the top 10 it wouldn’t feel as though we were being beaten by someone who isn’t around to enjoy the success. I’d like to think Poe would be humble, friendly and approachable and he wouldn’t let success go to his head but he’d use it to drive him further to write brilliant pieces of work and even help out his fellow horror poets like myself.

However, for every good idea we must weigh the bad as well. Would the success, stress, fame and public scrutiny get to him? If none of these did then surely his personal and private life would have if it followed him in this era. Between his wife, personal issues and drinking perhaps like many writers after him he would just like it all to end but then again who truly knows as I am merely telling you to consider the idea. It’s better to think of the positive aspect but given we are talking about the morbid man of macabre we simply have to talk about the dark troubling negativity that surrounded him. Speaking of morbid and dark I would also think that today as a society we tend to not only be more open to horror then in Poe’s day but we enjoy even darker and disturbing stuff. Which asks the question, wouldn’t Poe be even darker in his writing today then he was in his day? Imagine how the Raven could be written if it was written today. Instead of Once upon a midnight dreary, we could see something along the lines of “Death pecked away on the darkest of nights making a man look more and more decayed. The point here is that if Poe were alive today he could have been even more deranged and disturbed in his writing which is hard to imagine seeing as he’s the king of macabre now for things he wrote way back when,

Edgar Allan Poe in many ways was a man before his time, a man born in the wrong era, a man who looked at the world as a long dark alleyway longing to be explored and analyzed even if it meant others would scorn him and let him have it. Yet without him people like me may not have been inspired to write and if not Poe then who? Who back then would have dawned the macabre mantle to inspire us horror writers nearly 200 years later? Well luckily we don’t have to wonder because our king and inspiration into the dark world of literature is Poe but if he were alive today, it makes you wonder, oh how it makes us wonder.


Want more Poe? Check out my board on Pinterest, https://www.pinterest.com/justinbienvenue/all-things-poe-nevermore/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">All Things Poe, Nevermore!

The Other Horror Poets

Posted on February 5, 2018 at 3:50 PM Comments comments (0)

Horror is undoubtedly one of the most popular genres in today’s literature. There are countless writers who strive to create that next big horror novel or script that next big horror movie. However the same cannot be said for the genre of poetry, while does have a following and many writers of it, is not nearly as big as it once was. To further make poets feel obscure if you’re a horror poet in today’s world you feel a bit alone because there’s not many of us and aside from Edgar Allan Poe what horror poets do we have to look up to? What of the other horror poets?

Horror poetry does exist but most people would say it’s quite an odd pairing or that the prestige just isn’t there. When you think horror poetry you think Edgar Allan Poe but who are some other horror poets? I’m not talking about horror writers because that list goes on and on but when it comes to horror poets well..the list of people just isn’t there. Sure there’s likely many horror poets and indie poets today but if we go back ten, twenty years or even back to Poes days who are some other horror poets? There really isn’t any or at least not to my findings.

I typed in horror poets on Google and as expected Edgar Allan Poe came up first but after that a bunch of other poets came up some well known but none strickly considered to be horror poets, some just listed because Google saw the word “poet” and just assumed. I looked and I looked but I could not find any other horror poets besides Poe. I saw a few names such as Siegfried Sassoon, Emily Dickinson, H.P Lovecraft and Lewis Caroll. Sassoon was more of a writer of the horrors of war and wrote war poems, Dickinson was more of a writer of depression, Lovecraft wrote science fiction and Carroll was more known for Alice in Wonderland and other stories than anything. So this drew me to one big conclusion, these authors either wrote poetry that has small undertones of horror but isn’t considered horror or at one point in time they wrote a horror poem but that doesn’t y any means qualify them as being considered horror poets. Can you write in one genre and still make an impact in another? Of course and the same case can be made for poets who write the occasional horror poem.

So what does this all mean? That’s not clear. Are there other horror poets? I’m sure there is but my search as deep as it was just simply didn’t turn up any other names strong enough to connect to the horror poetry genre. I am positive that there’s other horror poets out there from back in the day just like I know for a fact that there’s writer of horror poetry today. The one thing I can take from this is that there are horror poems from poets who didn’t write in the horror genre. They decided to test the waters and take a stab(no pun intended) at the genre. In another article I will talk about some of those poems by poets and analyze them as to what they meant at the time and what they mean to poets and readers today. Poe may have been alone in his own little world after all when he wrote all those dark and dreary poems but years later I don’t think I am alone. I have Poe and I’m sure I have other horror poets within the genre to look up to and become inspired by, to explore and discover. Poetry is not dead and neither is horror poetry.

1992's Dracula: Love Story or Horror?

Posted on October 25, 2017 at 4:30 PM Comments comments (0)

It’s been a while since I’ve seen the 1992 film of Dracula portrayed by Gary Oldman. As I was browsing images of the movie on Pinterest two thoughts crossed my mind; is the movie truly a horror of the classic or an infused love story? My second question is why in the heck does Dracula look the way he does in true form? Whose idea was that? These two questions may not pose a concern for most but I have been scratching my head over them and have some thoughts as to what could be the possible answers to them. I don’t know about anyone else but I prefer the classic cape wearing, fang showing, I want to suck your blood, I am Vlad the Impaler type of Dracula. The man who looks as he always does and doesn’t hind behind a facade because he’s an oddity.

Is it a horror or a love story? At first glance and thought you think it’s the same telling of every other version of Dracula and you would be right. Dracula comes into town, meets Mina and Jonathan, uses his allure over Mina, Jonathan doesn’t know what’s going on and everyone finds out what Dracula is and stops him. (Great quick telling of the story right?) However in the 1992 version I feel it’s more love-inspired and infused and a lot more sexual. Back in the day of the original love stories weren’t taboo but sex was but even then Dracula wasn’t exactly Casanova or Mr. Suave to Mina but in the 1992 version he is and the passion and love within the movie is a lot more different. Why is this? Well there’s three reasons, one obvious and the others may not even realize until now. The first reason is simple; it’s a different telling of a story with that director and producer’s vision on it. Same story but different, themes, moods, feelings, etc.

The second reason? It was he nineties. Vampires were already becoming over sexualized and by the time the nineties rolled around everything had a love, sex, passion vibe to it. In this instance it was no different. They took the Dracula classic and turned it into a more love inspired movie because it was the thing to do in the 90's. Reason number three is probably the one you would least suspect but after you hear it you’ll start to ponder it for yourself. In the film, Gary Oldman plays Dracula, he’s odd looking as a vampire(I’ll get into this later) but to keep up appearances he of course portrays a suave well looking gentleman as a human. If you take a closer look though you’ll realize Gary Oldman looks a lot like Vlad Tepes aka Vlad the Impaler(coincedence?) but the Vlad connection doesn’t stop there. For those who know the tale of Vlad the Impaler know he was a ruthless and cruel man but there’s more to him than that.

Upon his return from war, Vlad found out his wife jumped to her death from their castle Dracula. Vlad was devastated. Bram Stoker didn’t just take the violent, bloodthirsty part from Vlad the Impaler to create Dracula, he also used the sad history of a man who loses the love of his life. In the 1992 film, Dracula in many ways is like Vlad the Impaler who longs to be with Mina because she reminds him so much of his late beloved wife. This is perhaps why to me the movie seems more love-infused than other portrayals because the director did his research and really decided to use the background of Vlad the Impaler and give the film a more deeper meaning and effect. Also because of the bigger lover effect it’s why the film is a lot more sexual than other versions.

Finally, why does Dracula look the way he does in the film? Why does he look like the love child of George Washington and Bette Midler? For one, perhaps the director wanted to stay away from the classic cliche and decided to make his Dracula look far, far different from the original usual versions. Perhaps he wanted to make his version look more like the old creature that he truly is or maybe even give him a look that is hideous compared to his other versions he dawns during the film. So there you go, a little analysis on the 1992 film of Dracula and why it could be more of a love film and why Dracula looks the way he does.

Do Demons Have A Gender?

Posted on October 25, 2017 at 4:10 PM Comments comments (0)

When we hear the word “demon” we all think of evil, darkness, the devil, Hell and others just to name a few. We know what the definition of a demon is, we know what it personifies and we know they can be classified under as supernatural and paranormal beings. One thing that never gets questioned or brought up is what is the gender of a demon? A demon can enter the body of a male or female but what about the demon itself? Is it a certain gender? Does it have both genders? Does it prefer one over the other? Or do demons simply take on and possess whatever body they want based off the convenience and circumstances? I’ll break this down and give my thoughts and opinions on the matter but one thing should go without saying, is doesn’t matter what gender a demon is, it’s evil and it’s out to cause harm to humans.

What gender are demons? Well while they can inhabit either gender I think a demon itself could be one of two options. They could actually be a male or female demon however when it comes to inhabiting a body I highly doubt demons care which they possess and I’m sure they don’t stereotype. You think a male demon is going to enter the body of a human male simply because that’s how it has to be? Doubtful. The other option is that a demon may have no gender at all and it’s simply an entity that when it surfaces to Earth is simply looking for a vessel aka a body to control and it doesn’t care which gender it takes on. Both these two options seem possible and whether one seems more likely than the other is up for debate but I see it as it could be one or the other and a fifty-fifty split.

One thing is for certain, it truly doesn’t matter which gender a demon is because they are all after one thing; to inflict harm, kill or even possess a human being. We know how they come to be and where they generally come from or so we are lead to believe. This notion however has nothing to do with gender, so why do I bring it up? For the same reason why it doesn’t matter where they come from whether it’s Hell, another dimension, a book, a spell, it doesn’t matter, they are demons and we know their intent. Gender for the third time is no different, it doesn’t make a bit of difference which gender they are but I raise the questions simply out of curiosity. Let’s say demons do have gender’s, are one type more inferior than the other? Irrelevant because? Well you get the idea but just remember that if you’re a sexist male and you encounter a female demon and think it’s not that scary, think again! Do demons have a gender? I’m not sure but I do wonder and ponder the thought.

"Women Don't Write Horror", Challenging the Misconception

Posted on October 24, 2017 at 4:00 PM Comments comments (0)

This latest guest post is from author Sara Jane Townsend and how women are not seen as writers of horror. This is a common theme in the writing and horror industry and it's good to see someone taking the time to speak up about it. Here are Sara's thoughts on how women don't write horror. 


Many years ago, I belonged to an amateur theatre group. One of the ladies there was also a member of a writing group, and she encouraged me to accompany her to a meeting. I was in my early twenties at the time. A couple of things became immediately apparent – the first was evident when I first walked in, and realised I was at least twenty years younger than everyone else in the room.

The next thing took a little while to manifest itself. Initially people were very friendly, welcoming me into the group, but it seemed that most members of the group wrote romance novels and radio plays. And then I was asked that crucial question: “and what do you write?” “Horror,” I replied cheerfully.

Suddenly I understood the meaning of the phrase “deafening silence,” as it descended on the room at that moment. Everyone was staring at me. Eventually someone cleared their throat and said awkwardly, “Oh. We’ve never had one of THOSE before.”

Needless to say, I never went back to that writing group. Since then I have actively sought out other horror writers so that I feel less like a social pariah, but still there have been occasions over the years when people do a double take when I tell them I’m a horror writer. Generally what I get is “but you seem so nice,” with the implication being, clearly, that only weirdos and psychopaths could write horror.

The concept that women don’t write horror seems mystifying to me. After all, it could be argued that the first modern horror novel was “Frankenstein” – which was written by a teenage girl.

I’ve not always been a fan of horror, though. As a child, scary stories gave me nightmares. Then in grade 8, two things happened. First, I came across a book called ‘Different Seasons’ in the school library. This book, as any horror fan knows, consists of four novellas by Stephen King (three of which have been turned into films). I loved the book so much I went looking for more by the same author. The next one I picked up was “Carrie”. As a bullied teenager this one spoke volumes to me, and ever since then the illustrious Mr King has been my inspiration.

The second thing that happened was that my English teacher assigned the class to write a horror story. I always loved getting writing assignments at school – since most of my spare time was taken up by writing stories anyway, this never seemed like a chore to me. But I had never tried writing horror before. I ended up writing a story about ten teenagers who go on a camping trip and accidentally unleash a malevolent presence that possessed them and led them to kill each other horribly. While the story itself wasn’t all that good – I was only thirteen at the time, and had a lot to learn about writing – it triggered in me an appreciation for horror. And there’s been no stopping me since.

In many ways, horror has kept me sane. Throughout my teenage years I was able to exorcize the demons of puberty by writing about them. I wrote a lot of short horror stories in my late teens and early twenties and there are common themes that underline them all. Betrayal, isolation and loneliness are frequent refrains (and if anyone’s interested, the best of these early stories can be found amongst the stories in my collection SOUL SCREAMS).

When I started writing – and reading – horror, I never thought about it in terms of gender. I liked the genre, so I kept on writing it. It never occurred to me that “women don’t write horror”. In the 1990s, when I started submitting short stories, there were a lot of small press magazines around for the horror genre, and the stories within them were fairly evenly spread between male and female writers. At some point in the late 1990s, though, horror fell out of favour. This was bad news for me, as I’d started submitting my first horror novel and was struggling to find places to send it to. Horror seemed to disappear completely from book shops in the UK at that time. You’d find the likes of Stephen King and James Herbert in the ‘bestsellers’ section, and occasionally other horror writers would be shelved in ‘general fiction’, but there was no section specifically for horror.

In some ways, since then we seem to have been going backwards in terms of gender expectations. Toys and clothes for children are very clearly defined as for boys or for girls. I always thought this sends out a very bad message for children, as they learn early on that society wants them to get into a particular box, so that they can be neatly bombarded with the right marketing messages. Boys don’t play with dolls. Girls don’t play with cars. Girls wear clothes adorned with sparkly cute cartoon characters; boys wear t-shirts with superhero logos on.

When I first became aware of gender stereotyping, during my teenage years, it really bothered me that society wanted people to fit into particular boxes. For instance, I decided fairly on I didn’t want to have children. It still amazes me that there’s an assumption that all women have this nurturing maternal instinct. If that’s the case, I must have been absent when it was handed out.

I get particularly cross at Christmas, when we are bombarded by commercials that are full of sexist assumptions – that women want make-up sets and perfume for Christmas, and men want video games and the latest Black & Decker power tool. Anyone that knows me well enough to buy me a Christmas present ought to know I’d rather have a video game than a make-up kit, and I’m allergic to perfume so don’t even go there.

And really, that’s what the whole gender debate is about – marketing. I’m no expert on marketing (if I was I’d be selling a lot more books), but it does seem to be that there are a lot of short cuts taken when it comes to marketing anything, including books. “Men read spy thrillers and horror so let’s assume our audience for this new horror novel is entirely made up of men. Women read romance and ‘chick lit’, so we make the cover of this novel about a single twenty-something perennially looking for love all pink and sparkly”. There are plenty of us with two x-chromosomes who don’t read romance novels. During the wave of urban fantasy that rode in on the back of the success of ‘Buffy’ in the early 2000s I objected to those books that called themselves ‘urban fantasy’ but in reality were just romance novels involving supernatural creatures. I prefer to have my violence untainted by romance.

The problem is, it’s too easy to slap labels on things when you’re aiming for an easy sell. But if you work a bit harder, you’ll find a more appreciative audience. The same goes for horror. It’s very easy to name ten male top-selling horror authors, and wave that list around and say “well, women don’t write horror”.

The fact is, we do. You might have to delve a bit deeper into the genre to uncover the dark and disturbing stuff, but trust me, it’s there. And the more people read, and talk about, women horror writers, the more chance we’ve got of breaking the stereotype.

I’d like to set a challenge to all fans of horror reading this column. In 2018, make it a goal to discover and read at least two horror novels by women you haven’t read before. Challenge that myth that women don’t write horror, because you’ll find that we can give you nightmares just as well as Stephen King can.

Sara Jayne Townsend is a UK-based writer, and someone tends to die a horrible death in all of her stories. She was born in Cheshire in 1969, but spent most of the 1980s living in Canada after her family emigrated there. She now lives in Surrey with two cats and her guitarist husband Chris.

She decided she was going to be a published novelist when she was 10 years old and finished her first novel a year later. It took 30 years of submitting, however, to fulfil that dream.

She is author of several horror novels, and a series of mysteries featuring contemporary actress and amateur sleuth Shara Summers.

Learn more about Sara and her writing at her website (http://sarajaynetownsend.weebly.com)



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